LABORATORY FOR

PHYSICAL SCIENCES

8050 Greenmead Drive,

College Park, MD 20740

Phone: (301) 935-6400

Fax: (301) 935-6723

Email: info@lps.gov

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The Microelectronics Integration (MI) program at the Laboratory for Physical Sciences (LPS) conducts research on advanced manufacturing approaches and related technology. MI maintains the cleanroom facilities at LPS. Contact us.

The MI group conducts research at the interface of aerosol jet printing and traditional 3-dimensional printing systems to fabricate novel electronic components and systems.  The ultimate goal is to embed/integrate components, print on arbitrary non-flat surfaces, and accomplish this at temperatures below 150°C.  Areas of research include ink and materials characterization, printed interconnects, antennas and RF components, 3D printed structures, printing platforms, and embedded components for replacing surface mount components.  We are directly engaged with the NextFlex initiative and industrial partners to advance the manufacturing base in printed hybrid electronics.

PRINTED HYBRID ELECTRONICS

The MI group conducts research, utilizing in-house Back-End-of-the-Line (BEOL) capabilities, on novel alternate circuit and system fabrication techniques to enable system and component miniaturization for low size/weight/power (SWAP) hardware systems.  Areas of research include Through Silicon Vias (TSV), flexible substrates, wafer level processes, 3-dimentioanl integration (3DI), single die processing, and polymer based modulators.

ADVANCED PACKAGING

The MI group conducts research on the fabrication of magnetic components and systems with an emphasis on miniaturization and spin-orbit interactions for use in magnetic memory and logic devices.  We are an integral member of a Government Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) working group to educate government researchers and users of MTJ technology and help build a community linking government, academia, and industry.

MAGNETICS

  The MI group conducts research in novel imaging techniques such as compressive sensing, single pixel imaging, and mmWave techniques.  We also have a suite of imaging equipment to explore novel applications of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Computed Tomography X-ray to device characterization and device physics phenomena.  

IMAGING

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